Fred and Jean's Travel Photos

2005 - Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming

Home
Travels 2013
Travels 2007
Travels 2005
Travels 2004
Borrego 2004
Arizona 2004
History of Our Yard
Contact Us

The Three Peaks of the Teton Range
The Three Peaks of the Teton Range
Click to enlarge

Just south of Yellowstone National Park lies Grand Teton National Park. As a part of the vast and expansive Rocky Mountains, the Tetons are a relatively small but dramatic mountain range that was named by a French trapper who called them "tetons" (the French word for breast). The national park was named after Grand Teton, which, at an altitude of 13,770 feet, is the largest of the three peaks of the range.

Much of the beauty and grandeur of the Grand Teton National Park can be seen from the main road that runs mostly north to south with numerous overlooks (see map [PDF-88 KB]). As far as a variety of trails, it's a hiker's paradise!

The Tetons from Jackson Lake
The Tetons from Jackson Lake
Click to enlarge


The photo to the left was taken from Willow Flats Overlook with Jackson Lake, the largest lake in the park, in front of the mountains. It was taken on our first day driving into the park. As you can see by the sky, it was a clear and beautiful day with the exception of a few puffy clouds over the mountains. Unfortunately, that was not the case the next day.


The Mountains from Jenny Lake Overlook
The Mountains from Jenny Lake Overlook
Click to enlarge



About 12 miles south of Jackson Lake is the much smaller Jenny Lake (see photos right and below). What it lacks in size, it more than makes up for in scenery! Our second day in the park happened to be very hazy—and eventually cloudy—which severely interfered with our great photo opportunities!

The Mountains from the Jenny Lake Overlook
The Mountains from the Jenny Lake Overlook
Click to enlarge

We've been told that we should include more photos of us, so here we each are standing at the Jenny Lake Overlook, delighting in the gorgeous surroundings. The nearby hiking path was so inviting that I was very tempted to follow it as far as I could. However, practicality (Fred is thy name) pushed us on so we could appreciate more of the park.

Jean at Jenny Lake - Grand Teton Nat'l Park
Jean at Jenny Lake - Grand Teton Nat'l Park
Click to enlarge

Fred at Jenny Lake - Grand Teton Nat'l Park
Fred at Jenny Lake - Grand Teton Nat'l Park
Click to enlarge

With the disappointingly poor visibility on our second day there, many of our photos are less appealing than I would like. In order to offer a splendid and authentic photo representation of the Teton Mountains, I "borrowed" one from the National Park Service web site.

The Teton Mountains in Winter
The Teton Mountains in Winter
National Park Service Web Site Photo

Never let it be said that if there were wildflowers growing where I was that I didn't photograph them! Below are two that were taken at the Jackson Point Overlook from Signal Mountain.

Blue Wildflowers
Blue Wildflowers
Click to enlarge

White Wildflowers
White Wildflowers
Click to enlarge

Next

Back

Copyright 2016 Jean Kennerson