Fred and Jean's Travel Photos

2005 - Yellowstone National Park, page 4

Home
Travels 2013
Travels 2007
Travels 2005
Travels 2004
Borrego 2004
Arizona 2004
History of Our Yard
Contact Us

Fishing Bridge, Yellowstone National Park
Fishing Bridge, Yellowstone National Park
Click to enlarge

Fishing Bridge
The Fishing Bridge Campground, on the north end of Yellowstone River, is where we stayed in our motorhome during our visit. It's a good central location to explore the park and the village has the added advantage of the bridge itself.

The original Fishing Bridge was built in 1902 by Hiram Chittenden. It was a very popular place for visitors to fish because it is a spawning area for cutthroat trout. The bridge was rebuilt in 1937, and fishing from the bridge was stopped in 1973 because of the decline of the cutthroat population.

Pelican In Flight Over Yellowstone Lake
Pelican In Flight Over Yellowstone Lake
Click to enlarge


The day before we left Yellowstone for Grand Teton National Park, we spent some time at the Fishing Bridge, mostly so I could take photos. As expected, there are plenty of fish, and as a result, pelicans to catch them! (See photo at left.)







The 1988 Wildfire
The 1988 burn area is still detectable, with timber lying dead on the ground everywhere; yet many dead trees are still standing like toothpicks stuck in the ground. Most areas show signs of regrowth, however, with new trees, underbrush, wildflowers, and all the other plants that grew there before.

Gibbon River and Part of 1988 Burn Area
Gibbon River and Part of 1988 Burn Area
Click to enlarge

Although the fire was devastating at the time with over a million acres in the greater Yellowstone area scorched, it is a natural occurrence and, in some cases, is necessary in nature. One example of that is with the Lodgepole Pine: its seed pods are so thick that in order to spread the seeds, they need the extreme heat of fire to break them open to be released.

Wildlife
The entire park is also home to many forms of wildlife, from the very small to the very large. Bison is the most frequently seen of the large wildlife, although we were fortunate to see some elk, too. The moose apparently come down to the lower elevations only during the winter.

Other less frequently seen large wildlife includes bears, coyotes, wolves, red foxes, bobcats, mountain lions, and lynxes. These are just a small sampling of animals that called Yellowstone Park home. For more information and outstanding photos of Yellowstone wildlife, see this site.

Bison with Babies Crossing Water
Bison with Babies Crossing Water
Click to enlarge

Lone Elk at Canyon Junction
Lone Elk at Canyon Junction
Click to enlarge

Next

Back

Copyright 2016 Jean Kennerson